Tag Archives: sleep quality

How Often Should You Replace Your Pillow?

5 Ways to Assess if Your Pillow Needs Replacing

If you can’t remember the last time you changed your pillows, know that you’re not alone. We don’t tend to think about the longevity or performance of our pillows when we lay down at night, exhausted from a long day. We’re just happy to be in bed, able to catch some shut eye – if only for a few hours. However, if you want to guarantee that the sleep you are having is top quality, that starts with your pillows.

Even though you aren’t a pillow expert, there are a few easy steps you can take to assess if your pillows are in desperate need of replacement.

Here are 5 quick tips for determining if you need some new pillows:

  1. The Fold Test: Take your pillow, and attempt to fold it in half. If you fold it in half and your pillow quickly bounces back into shape once you let go, chances are you have a few more months with that pillow. However, if your pillow fails to assume its prior shape, and slumps sadly onto the bed, it’s definitely time to consider new, supportive pillows. These are the things that support your head throughout the night, after all.


  1. Take a Peek: Sometimes, what we can see in plain sight is telling enough. Take off the pillowcase and observe your pillows. Do you see any yellowish stains? Those stains are the result of body oils, dead skin, and dust mites building up over time – yuck! If your pillows are discolored, you definitely need some new pillows and bedding.


  1. Take a Whiff: Moving onto the next sense, smell, it’s time to get up close and personal with your pillows on a scent level. Take your pillows and smell them. If they have an odor, it’s likely due to a bacteria build-up over time. That’s both disgusting and detrimental to you and your partner’s health. Time for some new, bacteria-free pillows.


  1. Feel It: Now it’s time to really feel around at the composition of your pillows. When you take and touch your pillow, can you feel lumps or feathers poking out of the pillow? Do you see foam or batting? If yes, that means your pillow has lost the supportive structure it once had. If the pillow is unable to contain its composition, it most certainly is unable to support your head and shoulders.



  1. Sleep Quality Test: This one is more figurative in nature. Sit down and really ponder if you are catching quality sleep at night. Do you wake up with a sore neck or headaches in the morning? Are you tossing and turning all night, struggling to find a comfortable sleeping position with your pillow? Is your pillow giving you the support it used to, a long time ago? If you suspect your pillow is linked to your sleep quality, it’s time for pillow replacement.



Here at Pillows.com, we’re happy to provide you with new, clean, structurally sound pillows that are complementary to a sound night of sleep.






read more

How The Pillows.com Staff Are Prioritizing Sleep In 2018

Few things will snap you out of a glorious slumber than the feeling of tiny fingers prying your eyelids open and a small voice uttering “Mommy are you awake?” It’s a moment where your heart melts and you want to commit a crime at the same time. Little does this tiny human know that despite the fact that you are in fact awake (now), that you have already been awake several times throughout the night. Was that a cough? Better go check. What was that sound? Better go check. Is she too hot? Too cold? Better go check? Did I finish my wine? Better go check.

image from mirror.co.uk





In order to be a mom, or a functioning person for that matter, getting good sleep is totally necessary. And I don’t mean good sleep as in “I got a full 40 minutes, Buddy-the-Elf” style of sleep, I’m talking 8 hours of sleep, the type where you actually haven’t had caffeine since 4 pm, didn’t drink too much wine, and you got off of your screen at a reasonable time before you went to bed. Will the stars ever align for those things to actually happen? Not while Netflix keeps putting out new releases. However, one thing that actual experts agree on is that sleep is crucial to holistic health and for some insane reason, sleep seems to be the one thing we all compromise on, because one more episode won’t hurt, will it?

On my search for this mystical thing called sleep, I wanted to reach out to my friends and co-workers and see if they feel like they are getting the recommended 7 to 9 hours of sleep (I had to look up how many hours of sleep we actually need to get) and it is no shock that 99% of them agreed that they sacrifice their sleep because of their addiction to Netflix, video games, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and cat videos on YouTube. Okay, that last one is me. Here’s what the staff of pillows.com (you know, the “experts”) had to say about their own personal quests for quality sleep.

Question: How many hours of sleep per night do you average?

Jordan: “On average, I sleep 6 hours a night.”

Chelsea: “I try my best to get 8-9 hours. I always make sure that I turn off the lights by 10:30 pm AT THE LATEST!”

Q: What is your ideal sleep environment?

Faydra: “Dark and quiet, squishy supportive pillow for my head and two body pillows for optimal pillow nesting.”

Toni: “Next to the ocean, listening to the waves.”

Q: Would you say you need more sleep?

Omar: “I think I need uninterrupted sleep more than more hours of sleep. I’ve tested it and 6-7 hours seems to be a good number for my body. But, unintentionally, I always seem to drink a lot of water before bed so I sometimes get up multiple times during the night.”

Chelsea: “I think I could invest more time for sleeps on the weekends. I tend to let go of my strict sleep schedule on Saturday nights. However, during the work week’s I’m very good at getting enough sleep.”

Q: Do you think technology gets in the way of your sleep?

Chris: “I do think that technology can get in the way of a normal sleep routine if you are trying to go to sleep at a decent time. Having a phone or laptop near the bed might lead to staying up much later than needed. Although I do have insomnia and sometimes staring at a screen watching a video or reading can make my eyes heavy enough that I am forced to close them long enough to doze off.”

Toni: “Yes! I sleep with the phone by my side and any text or noise letting me know I have a new email wakes me up.”

Q: Do you need white noise to sleep?

Faydra: “Silence.”

Chelsea: “I love white noise and absolutely need it. Sometimes when I can’t go to sleep, I’ll put on a show like “The Office” and fall asleep to the sound of Michael Scott whispering in my ear.”

Q: If you could give yourself one sleep goal to achieve this year what would it be?

Chris: “My one sleep goal for this year is to start meditating again when trying to sleep. Meditation relaxes my very active mind and can sometimes calm it enough to allow me to get some sleep. I used to meditate often before bed, but I have not done it in a while. It has helped before and I am sure that it will help again.”

Dana: “Spend time reading more before bed rather than being on my phone wasting time.”

Q: Do you have bad habits that interfere with your sleep?

Faydra: “Other than video games and my Instagram addiction, I would say no.”

Jordan: “The only bad habits I’d say I have are staying up to catch the last seconds of a TV show/movie and not going to bed at a more reasonable time.”

Can any of you relate to our staff? We all want more sleep but also want to finish that last episode or beat one more level. So, where do we go from here to make sleep a priority in 2018? Of course, my first spot to find all the answers would be Pinterest! Here is a list of 21 tips for better sleep but I have to warn you that I’m pretty sure that #2 is contestable.

We at pillows.com are going to commit to sleeping better together! Wait! You know what I mean! We’re going to hold each other accountable to getting quality sleep. In our own beds, separately. Oh man, I need more sleep.



read more

Sleeping in a Tank

What if there was a way to completely and momentarily escape the world around us? What if there was a way to only hear what is going in our head and experience nothing else? And, if there was a way to encounter all of this, what would it be like? Would it be relaxing? Would it mend mental wounds that prevent rest? Well, perhaps we might not need to ask further. Perhaps we might have a way to experience it first hand and find another way to help us sleep at night. However, the method to experience this potential phenomenon is straight out of a Sci-Fi thriller. Your best night’s sleep might be waiting inside of a Isolation Tank.

Behold! Today’s modern isolation tank! Not quite as intimidating as the movies portray, but almost as equally mysterious as they depict. The Isolation Tank was first invented in 1953 by neuroscientist John Lilly as a way to study response in the brain to a limited sensory output. “The tank immersed the user into a totally dark and silent environment in which sound and vision as well as other sensory inputs were virtually eliminated.” writer Dr. Christopher Winter notes. “The theory at the time was if all sensory inputs were cut off to the brain, the brain would reflexively go to sleep.” John Lilly would later go on to describe himself and these users as “psychonauts,” a fitting name to describe those who choose to float in this void. These aptly named Psychonauts would float on to push the boundaries of our perception involving conscious thought and question the definitions of sentience while senses are isolated. What started out as a scientific study on our minds and consciousness, by Lilly, became a sudden realization of the potential Isolation Tanks could have on our ability to recover mentally. This recovery could also lead to, supposedly, the best sleep of our lives.

With everyday life there is stress. Stress of work, stress of school, stress of exercise, etc. The main point is that stress is almost inherently in each and every aspect of our everyday. This stress weighs heavy on our minds and bodies and not exhausts us physically but also mentally. Prolonged exposure to these stresses without relief and recovery can lead to more serious problems. The Isolation Tank hails itself as a way to allow the mind to relax and, in a way, begin to heal itself or, at the very least, escape the stress for awhile. When floating in the tank, the water is the same temperature as our skin, the lights are completely off, and the capsule is sound proof. All these factors leave the active mind without the subconscious processing of the senses, and in other words, leaves the floater with their thoughts and nothing else. With just our thoughts and nothing else being registered, we may be able to peer into our minds and fix what is broken or calm what is hectic. At the very least, a user can calmly float and take a well-deserved nap.

Without actually trying one yet, I cannot say that the tank is a divine gift from above that has cured what keeps me up at night. Though I must admit, the list of what tank users have reported being relieved of makes me want to sign up immediately. The image of just floating carefree and detached from reality sounds like the goal of most vacations; even if it is for an hour or so. If you are stressed, exhausted, or just need a quick getaway, perhaps looking up your local float tank center and becoming a Psychonaut could be the perfect fit for you.




read more